South Korea Embraces Breakdancing Craze

Discussion in 'Word Up' started by AK47, Jul 11, 2007.

  1. AK47

    AK47 New Member

    Messages:
    3,065
    Likes Received:
    31
    My Way News - South Korea Embraces Breakdancing Craze

    2007 June 02

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - They spin on their heads, twist their bodies like pretzels and flip effortlessly through the air.

    They are South Korea's B-boys, hip hop-loving breakdancers who have become the country's hot cultural export decades after the original American dance craze.

    The South Korean government is latching on to B-boys' acrobatic moves as a way to promote the country's dynamic image and draw tourists, and leading corporations are featuring the dancers in TV commercials and high-profile events.

    New theater shows feature B-boys, who in Korea sometimes combine their syncopated hip hop beats with traditional Korean folk percussion to fuse new with old.

    At a three-day international dance battle that ends Sunday, B-boys from around the world praised the attention in South Korea, saying it was almost unheard of anywhere else today. The Korea Tourism Organization, city government and major companies sponsored the competition.

    "Korea is definitely leading the way," said Joe "Jorawk" Stolte, 24, a member of the "Massive Monkees" crew from Seattle. "It's really dope that the government here supports B-boy culture."

    B-boys trace their origin to the Bronx in New York in the late 1970s when they performed their stylized movements at street parties during the intense sections of hip hop songs referred to as the "break." The term "B-boy" is short for "Break-boy," or "Bronx-boy."

    South Korean B-boys say the movement here dates to the 1990s, with some young men taking it up for lack of other diversions before they entered mandatory two-year military service.

    The Korean scene did not get international notice until its debut at the annual Battle of the Year competition in Germany in 2002 - when the South Korean crew "Expression" took the top award. South Korean crews went on to win again in 2004 and 2005.

    Given Koreans' passion for winning and a culture that rewards success in anything - from the national soccer team to building bigger flat-screen TVs - the B-boys' winning ways captured the nation's imagination.

    "Korean people obviously like being No. 1. They don't say much about being in second place," said Chang Jae-bong, 30, head of the Korean "Drifterz" crew, one of the country's leading groups.

    In the crew's nationally televised performance Friday, The Drifterz B-boys threw their bodies through the air and slammed into the ground in pain-defying ways, strutting lightning-fast footwork before the finale's obligatory headspin.

    "When the Koreans start something, they have dedication and discipline so they get very good results," said Monica "Krazee Grandma" Masuda, a 67-year-old from Sweden who has been a B-girl for eight years - and pulled off a headspin of her own during an exhibition at Friday's group performance battle. "Korean breakers are top level in the world."

    South Korea's pop stars and actors have already gained wide followings across Asia as part of what is known as the "Korean Wave" - with girls from Thailand to Tokyo swooning over singers like Rain or actress Lee Young-ae.

    But there is concern Korea is losing its status as the barometer of what is hip across Asia. And the government is not willing to sit back and watch.

    "The creative power of B-boys makes this a chance to show Seoul's new culture," Vice Mayor Kim Heung-kwon said.
  2. bboy-cuk

    bboy-cuk New Member

    Messages:
    118
    Likes Received:
    1

    its all good, but really dont like this part
  3. bnewbie

    bnewbie Some guy in an ambulance

    Messages:
    1,178
    Location:
    New Brunswick
    they are described as doing gymnastic stuff and the essence of the dance is not described in the beggining

    bboy chuk - why cause bboy might get overexposed? if so i think so too
  4. snoopy8

    snoopy8 Bboy.org's MVP! BALLIN'!! Staff Member

    Messages:
    9,195
    Likes Received:
    87
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Tijuana
    heres news for u guys


    snoopy is not a mod yet lol
  5. bboy abe

    bboy abe Guest

    what's wrong with it? it's exposing breaking and letting more people know about breaking.
  6. MrSander7x

    MrSander7x The Champ

    Messages:
    1,837
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    Purdue University
    I like how the first few words in that article are "They spin on their heads". It makes me want to punch an infant. Seriously, we're just back to where we started here with the media craze. The bboy community has worked so hard to display an accurate representation of bboying as a dance and an artform and now we have the South Korean government using it as a tourist attraction. Does anyone else see something wrong with this picture? Does this sound familiar to anyone else? This article just pisses me off.
  7. BbOyJeOpArDy

    BbOyJeOpArDy M0DERHATER

    Messages:
    4,379
    Likes Received:
    40
    Location:
    Bay Area Cali & Pittsburgh
    there's always some positives and negatives to any event.

    a government sponsoring bboying....... that'd be pretty dope in america but then we'd see the rise of a lotta ppl just doing it for money or b/c they see it on tv and stuff......
  8. Desi Boogie

    Desi Boogie Real Talk

    Messages:
    3,777
    Likes Received:
    56
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Newcastle, Australia
    Korea's pretty much unique in that bboys there can make a living, solely from bboying in domestic and international events (as well as from endorsements and commercial enterprise). In the USA the same might be possible but their are still only a tiny portion of the many crews that are top level making a living solely from the dance.

    As for whether this is a good or a bad thing? I don't really worry too much, when we tried to portray hip hop properly through the last few years in the face of many posing as true heads, we met with ignorance and disinterest from mainstream media, i think the more open we are to them, the more they wish only to portray it as a fad or a novelty idea. We're never gonna be of huge interest of those in the wider public, except if we're making money or generating controversy. Why else do you think that 50 Cent and a whole host of other rappers (and this has been going on for at least the last 10 years now, probably closer to 20) get so much attention? Nobody ever gives credit for great songs or innovative musical concepts and flavour, they only care that your album sold 2 million records and how many times you said fuck on it.

    I don't want bboying to be JUST for the underground, i'm not so doubting of the heads in the culture that i think the media could kill the movement, but at the same time, even if i did want it to stay underground, i still wouldn't be worried because we disappear under the radar again once we've lost that "momentary appeal" we've gained from some controversy or money making occurrence.

    In short, don't fret about the commercialisation shit and don't worry too much about the culture. If the Koreans want to sell out (and believe me, many are, we are talking about one of the most capitalist countries in the world and an economic powerhouse) then let them, those crews will lose their respectability and edge if they sell out too much and after all, just remember that American crews have been doing shit like this since back in the 80's.

    If the Koreans have to get burnt to learn their lesson, then so be it.

    Peace
  9. bnewbie

    bnewbie Some guy in an ambulance

    Messages:
    1,178
    Location:
    New Brunswick
    mr sander - thats exactly what i meant
  10. Content

    Content I will chop you

    Messages:
    452
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Melbourne
    'least it's kinda getting out there. I mean, art as we know it didn't start with Picasso's recognition, and that cat had style. Yeah, I know that precedent is a little different, but they have an angle that they can work now.
  11. bboy-cuk

    bboy-cuk New Member

    Messages:
    118
    Likes Received:
    1

    yea.... i mean cmon, turist attraction ?
  12. nickdaman767

    nickdaman767 SWERVE

    Messages:
    298
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    LA where tha playas play
    haha all i have to say is type in BURT HERMAN on google images and see wat he lookes like

    i think he is exactly like many people out there..people who think that bboying is exactly what it isnt

    let them believe what they want..bboying is like an energy that flows through those that possess it..
    and in the end
    the true representation of the dance and artform comes stands out within the bboy, and he or she sees it

    yes...it would be much nicer if bboying were to be known as an art of expression
    but its not true bboying if its staged for tourism




    and speaking about korea..it reminds me of the Gamblerz crew

    check them out on google vids..the 05 BOTY..its pretty sweet
  13. M4A1

    M4A1 The Lord Our Shepard

    Messages:
    572
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Yeah.
    bboying turning into korean folk dance or something...
    lawl

Share This Page